Info Session and Coalition Meeting: Thurs, April 25, 2019

The Greater Harlem Coalition will have an informational and organizational meeting on Thursday, April 25th at 7:00 PM at The Greater Calvary Baptist Church, 55 W 124th St, New York, NY 10027.

Update: Homeless Shelter Planned for 1763-1771 Amsterdam Ave.

Notes from the CB9 subcommittee meeting regarding the Homeless Shelter plans in Harlem.

Mount Sinai Community Advisory Board

If you would like to offer your thoughts to the hospital on their plan to move 2,500 mental health and addiction services clients from Morningside Heights to West 124th Street, this is a great opportunity.

Transitional Homeless Shelter Planned for 1763-1771 Amsterdam Ave Between W 148th St and W 149th St.

Come speak out about an oversaturation of homeless services in Harlem.

Please Sign the Online Petition for Fair Share Practices in New York City

We oppose the addiction and psychiatric facility Mount Sinai plans to open on 124th St between Lenox Ave and Adam Clayton Powell Jr Blvd.

What is Killing People Who Live in Harlem?

Data gathered by the NYC Dept of Health shows that what Harlem needs most are cancer and heart disease-related health facilities. #harlem #eastharlem #fairshare

Where are the Homeless Shelters Located in NYC?

In Manhattan, homeless shelters are most concentrated in Central Harlem and East Harlem.

What is Fair Share?

In 2017, NYC City Council wrote a report outlining the policy of even distribution—fair sharing—of public services, both beneficial and least desirable. Communities of color and lower socioeconomic status, such as Harlem and East Harlem, have historically been the dumping ground for services unwanted in other communities. It is time to distribute these services evenly [...]

Greater Harlem Coalition Town Hall

The Greater Harlem Coalition Town Hall on Thursday, March 28th, at 7 pm at The Greater Calvary Baptist Church, 55 W 124th St, New York, NY 10027 (between Lenox/5th).

Drug and Alcohol-related Arrest Information for Manhattan, 2018

Wherever OASAS has sited opioid treatment programs, we find more drug/alcohol-related arrests. Not only that: size matters. The larger the OASAS licensed opioid program, the more likely the community is to have high rates of drug/alcohol arrests.

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