Staten Island v Harlem (Part 2)

In 2018 Staten Island had 50% more premature drug-related deaths than Harlem, yet Harlem has 6 times the Opioid Treatment Program capacity. As a result, many Staten Islanders have to travel to other boroughs (and to Harlem, for example) for help in their struggle with addiction.

OASAS Licensed Opioid Treatment Program Capacity – 2018

Staten Island v Harlem

Staten Island has 35% more people than Harlem, yet according to the New York Department of Health, in 2018 it had over 50% more premature drug-related deaths.

Premature Drug-Related Deaths – 2018

Bronx politicians pushed back. When will those in Harlem?

Who are the New York politicians you should contact and demand fair share practices be implemented in Harlem?

The politicians in The Bronx are pushing back on new substance abuse facilities:
https://thecity.nyc/2019/04/pols-shun-drug-center-in-bronx-opioid-od-hotspot.html

What have Harlem’s politicians done?
https://twitter.com/nysoasas

Photo: The potential future site of the disputed drug-treatment clinic at 5622 Broadway in Kingsbridge, The Bronx. Photo: Ese Olumhense/THE CITY

Info Session and Coalition Meeting: Thurs, April 25, 2019

The Greater Harlem Coalition will have an informational and organizational meeting on Thursday, April 25th at 7:00 PM at The Greater Calvary Baptist Church, 55 W 124th St, New York, NY 10027.

The Greater Harlem Coalition will have an informational and organizational meeting on Thursday, April 25th at 7:00 PM.  We’ll meet at The Greater Calvary Baptist Church, 55 W 124th St, New York, NY 10027. 

We want to update you on the latest regarding the new homeless shelter that has been proposed for Amsterdam Avenue, and the latest regarding Mount Sinai’s proposal to move 2,500 mental health and addiction services clients from Morningside Heights to West 124th Street.

We also will want to discuss two planned protests against the Mount Sinai project on Saturday, May 4th, and on Tuesday, May 14th.

Lastly, we want to encourage you to channel your skills and passion into helping The Greater Harlem Coalition fight oversaturation.  If you have a suggestion, knowledge that could be useful, or are willing to assist with an aspect of our work, let us know.


Greater Harlem Coalition Town Hall

The Greater Harlem Coalition Town Hall on Thursday, March 28th, at 7 pm at The Greater Calvary Baptist Church, 55 W 124th St, New York, NY 10027 (between Lenox/5th).

The Greater Harlem Coalition will host a Town Hall meeting next week, on Thursday, March 28th, at 7pm at The Greater Calvary Baptist Church: 55 W 124th St, New York, NY 10027 (between Lenox/5th).

This meeting will have representatives from Mount Sinai who are proposing moving their opioid treatment programs from Morningside Heights (near Columbia University and recently constructed luxury housing) to West 124th Street between Lenox and Adam Clayton Powell (a site already overwhelmed by 3 methadone programs, homeless shelters, and HIV/AIDS healthcare facilities).  

This shift of opioid programs into our already oversaturated community will allow Mount Sinai to expand their ‘higher end’ medical services such as their Cardiac Care Center in Morningside Heights.  At the same time it will continue the red-lining of Harlem and East Harlem as New York’s opioid treatment hub for patients from all 5 boroughs and even the suburbs (note that 75% of the patients attending opioid programs in Harlem commute into our community from outside Harlem).

Mount Sinai is hoping to serve its authorized client load of 800 patients at the 124th St location.

The Greater Harlem Coalition firmly supports and respects the right of people struggling with addiction to get the services they need in the communities where they live.  However, the attempt by Mount Sinai to red-line our community as their dumping ground for substance abuse programs is unacceptable. If the opioid crisis is one that affects all Americans regardless of gender, class, race, and geography, why does Mount Sinai always want to site their opioid facilities in low-income communities of color?

We hope to see you at our meeting next Thursday.  We hope to hear your thoughts on this issue. And, we hope that Mount Sinai will listen to your voice.

Letter of Support: Inez Dickens on the Concentration of Addiction Services in Harlem

Save the date for Thursday, March 28th, 2019. The Greater Calvary Church, 124th Street between Mount Morris Park West and Lenox Avenue.

Assemblywoman Inez Dickens has written a strong letter opposing Mount Sinai’s attempt to move their opioid programs from Morningside Heights into Harlem.

We were particularly impressed with the strong language concerning Northern Manhattan being “inundated with similar service providers.” We are having an impact.  In particular, the Greater Calvary Church’s Postcard Project has really helped

You can read the entire letter below:

Inez Dickens Letter of Support Against the Concentration of Addiction Services in Harlem

Please save the date Thursday, March 28th, 2019 at 7pm at The Greater Calvary Church, West 124th Street between Mount Morris Park West and Lenox Avenue.

Come out and thank Assemblywoman Dickens for her support. We will explain to Mount Sinai that Harlem is already oversaturated with addiction treatment services. Morningside Heights should shoulder their fair share of these programs.


Congressional Districts and Substance Abuse Facilities

A map highlighting the high concentration of substance abuse facilities in Harlem and Washington Heights

The map above shows in red dots each substance abuse facility across New York City.

The gray areas indicate the concentration of substance abuse facilities by federal congressional district.

As is shown, the greatest concentration exists in upper Manhattan which includes Harlem and Washington Heights.

The Oversaturation of Harlem

Harlem is proportionally oversaturated with social services, including substance abuse, homeless shelters, halfway houses, mental health services.