Opioid Treatment Deserts

While Harlem is oversaturated with 18% of drug treatment capacities, many districts have no such capacities whatsoever

The distribution of Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) reflects the historic and ongoing medical redlining of low-income communities of color. This map of New York City shows (in red) Community Districts that have little or no OASAS licensed programs to support their opioid-addicted residents. As a result, their community members must commute to other, oversaturated neighborhoods for treatment.

Community Districts in red have an Opioid Treatment Program capacity of under 100 for their entire community.
Community Districts in red have an Opioid Treatment Program capacity of under 100 for their entire community.

Oversaturation by Community District (Community Board)

Graph illustrating the capacity of OASAS-certified OTPs
OASAS is oversaturating East Harlem

This visualization illustrates how East Harlem is oversaturated by OASAS. Given that 84% of all opioid treatment programs in CB11 commute into East Harlem from other Community Districts, our community is shouldering far more than its fair share.

East Harlem Burdened By More Than Its Fair-Share

East Harlem (in red, below) hosts a disproportionate number of OASAS-licensed Opioid Treatment Programs, that wealthier zip codes have rejected. This graph clearly illustrates that the NYS Office of Addiction Services and Supports applies discriminatory medical redlining, forcing low-income communities of color to bear more than their fair share of programs.

OASAS Licensed Opioid Treatment Program Capacity Totals (by Zip Code)