NY Govt Wants to Hear Your Views on Pending Merger of Dept of Addiction Services and Dept of Mental Health

@NYOASAS and @NYSOHM are on a listening tour. Pls send your views to @NYGovCuomo! This is the chance to help build a more effective @NYOASAS and stop the issue of oversaturation
#greaterharlem #redliningharlem
#inequity
#oversaturation

There is an imminent plan at NY State to merge OASAS (Department of Addiction Services and Supports) and DOMH (Department of Mental Health). To this end, the departments are accepting public statements to understand best ways forward.

Let’s take advantage of this unique opportunity to help the government create a more effective Addiction Services for New York State. Submit a statement here

Or, you can just write to @NYSOASAS and @NYGovCuomo on twitter.

Tell them OASAS must do a better job in (1) preventing a neighborhood from being oversaturated with drug treatment facilities and (2) monitoring the impact of drug treatment centers on the nearby areas.

See more detail of the announcements below:

Governor Cuomo’s announcement of merger of DOMH and OASAS. Click on the image to learn more

Your statements don’t have to be lengthy or exhaustive.  A simple, heartfelt request from you is sufficient.  As we always say, they can’t read our minds.  We need to tell them what Harlem wants them to do.

CBS News: Oversaturation of Harlem has attracted illegal drug sellers

CBS News story on how the Oversaturation of drug clinics in Harlem attracts scores of illegal drug sellers

Last night the co-founder of The Greater Harlem Coalition, the President of MMPCIA, and other concerned residents from our community were featured on CBS News. The article explored how the oversaturation of substance abuse programs in Harlem and East Harlem has attracted scores of illegal drug sellers who prey on the men and women seeking addiction help.

Drug deal W. 124th St between Lenox and ACP

The CBS reporter was shown photographs, and video evidence of how the OASAS licensed programs fail to monitor or supervise their clients before or after treatment, and turn a blind eye to the drug selling and using that is occurring steps from their programs.

Residents complained about how Mayor De Blasio and Governor Cuomo have tolerated the decline in public safety in our community and failed to address it – in sharp contrast to the Mayoral response to complaints from the Upper West Side.

The powerful coverage features a number of our visualizations from the data that prove our claims.

When asked to respond to the issue of oversaturation and our deteriorating quality of life, the Mayor’s Office gave a non-response and avoided addressing the question:

Click here to see the full segment:

Mount Sinai = Methadone in Harlem and East Harlem

With new data from a FOIL request to OASAS, the size of Mount Sinai’s methadone programs relative to other Harlem and East Harlem providers is possible. On the screenshot below, you can see how the Mount Sinai programs on West 124th Street and East 125th Street dominate our community

To see the entire city (and note how unevenly distributed Opioid Treatment Programs are), see the full map, below.

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/RNUZ2/1/

Significant Increases in Admits to Harlem Opioid Treatment Programs: 2017–2020 See all NYC statistics

Comparing identical examples of OASAS FOIL data from 2017 and now 2020, we are able to see how admissions to Opioid Treatment Programs have increased or decreased in specific communities.

The map below shows increases in red and decreases in blue.

Click on the map and hover over any of the dots to learn more. Note that the size of the dot indicates a larger program.

Opioid Treatment Deserts 2020

The updated map shows the communities in New York that have no opioid treatment centers. Williamsburg, Astoria are examples


New data from the NYS Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) allowed us to map the inverse of what people typically map – a lacuna. In particular, we were interested in learning which Community Districts in New York are Opioid Treatment Program (OTP) deserts. The resulting map shows the communities in New York that have no OTPs in red. The consequence is that residents in these neighborhoods who are suffering from addiction to opioids have to travel to communities like Harlem and East Harlem (often daily), for treatment.

Explore the map here:

https://fordham.carto.com/u/shill18/builder/8202e3cd-d7ca-4fc5-9c79-22d883c3b51d/embed

Oversaturation in CB11

East Harlem has 14% of NYC’s opioid treatment capacities but only 1.5% of NYC’s population

A resident of CB11 has undertaken an amazing analysis of how oversaturated East Harlem is:

While East Harlem has 1.5% of New York City’s population, it has 13.6% of New York City’s drug treatment capacity, according to data as of 2019 from NY agency OASAS. The graphic below illustrates how severely East Harlem is oversaturated with drug treatment facilities. This unfair social injustice MUST END!

East Harlem has 1.5% of population but 13.6% of drug treatment capacity
Data source: NYC Government OASAS Agency as a FOIL request by Y Pielet as of April 2019

With so many patients commuting into East Harlem for drug treatment, our district is overburdened while already struggling with other social, environmental, economic, and educational issues. Petition to your elected officials – Send Email or call them -to either dramatically reduce our 13.6% burden or perhaps allocate 13.6% of New York City’s budget as a compensation for this injustice.

Drilling down to the data, we can see that Beth Israel Medical Center and Harlem East Life Plan alone contribute to nearly 60% of the capacity. Elected officials should immediately discuss ways to reduce this capacity.

Beth Israel and Harlem East Life Plan represent 60% of the district's capacity

As for which district is not receiving its fair share of drug treatment capacities? Data speaks for itself

Manhattan is oversaturated with drug treatment capacities

Where Are They From?

The Greater Harlem Coalition has researched and repeatedly proven the oversaturation of substance use programs in Harlem and East Harlem using data from the agencies responsible. Our neighborhood hosts many more addiction programs than are justified by our population, by our addiction rates, or even by the drug related (overdose) death rate.

Given this, it is logical to ask, “Where then, do the patients who are admitted to New York City addiction programs, come from?

Using a 2020 FOIL request regarding admission data, we have mapped the home addresses of patients who attend NYC’s substance abuse programs. The result is national. Residents of San Diego, Maine, Miami Beach, and even Anchorage Alaska, are admitted to New York addiction programs.

In the following maps, the red dots indicate the home addresses of people who are admitted to New York City’s addiction programs. The larger and darker the red dots, the greater number of admitted patients.

From:

Admissions to NYS OASAS‐certified Chemical Dependence Treatment Programs Located in NYC by Zip Code of Residence, from March 1, 2019 through February 29, 2020: NYS OASAS Data Warehouse, CDS extract of 8/30/2020

To see the live map (you can hover over a dot to learn more):

A Letter from OASAS in Response to Our Email to Gov. Cuomo

The Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) recently sent us a letter in response to our concerns about the proposed facility for mental health and substance abuse services.

The Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) recently sent us a letter in response to our concerns about the proposed facility for mental health and substance abuse services on West 124th Street, between Lenox Ave and Adam Clayton Powell Ave.

We encourage our supporters to read the letter attached and help us to find ways to decrease the number that are concentrated in Harlem. These concentration of services include substance abuse facilities, homeless shelters and halfway houses, and mental health facilities.

Greater Harlem Coalition supports the need for easy access of all of these services to New Yorkers, but feel it is time to share these services and distribute them evenly across the city and state.